Tag Archives: China

Olympic Closing

As I watched parts of the closing ceremony and listened to the commentators heap gooey praise on China for putting on such a great event, I thought about all the human rights violations that were covered up by the news media and reporters in order to get the coverage they wanted.  I also asked myself,”How much of this junk is real?”  Obviously it was delayed due to time zones, but how much of it was pre -taped and edited for TV?  Of the lights, fireworks, and music, am I watching a performance that was filmed live, or is this some cinematic reproduction?  NBC has shown that they are quite capable of complicity with the communist government of China, so I guess it wold not be a huge surprise to find that the closing, like the opening, was full of fakery.  Like someone said before, the fake gymnasts’ ages, the fake fans, fake fireworks, and fake singing of the cute girl cannot be where this whole thing ends.  Everything this government does is fake, and NBC needed the coverage and the money.  Bring back the games for the sake of the games without all the hype and fakery.

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Olympic Ruminations

  1. The USA continues to get ripped off by incompetent judges. This further demonstrates why gymnastics, while highly impressive and entertaining, is not a sport. It is an exhibition of talent, strength, and skills that is quite remarkable. Nastia Liukin performed her uneven bar routine with fewer deductible mistakes than He Kexin (Chinese winner), yet Kexin won the event. To make it worse, there was not a single judge from a country who has an Olympic gymnastics medal. And to add insult to injury, the gold medal winning Chinese did not win with a higher score. She won on with a tie score, of which the tie-breaking system, according to Bob Costas and Béla Károlyi is an arbitrary system giving even more power to fewer judges. This seems like a recipe for fraud. This is the second US girl who has fallen victim to judging “mistakes” with the Chinese benefiting in both occasions.
  2. Shawn Johnson finally won gold in Beijing. She does it on seemingly the most difficult piece of equipment. The balance beam is so difficult because many times they are landing on the beam totally blind. I don’t know how they do it. Nastia Liukin continues her run of medals (which should be two golds instead of one) with a silver as America once again goes one and two.
  3. People criticizing Usain Bolt need to back off. This 21 year-old Jamaican athlete is downright amazing and deserves to be a little exuberant. It’s amazing in several ways. First, it’s amazing that a 6’5″ sprinter can run the 100 meters so fast. They say the shorter and more compact runners have an advantage in the sprints due to the quick strides. Bolt is built like a basketball player. Second, he won the gold in the 100 meter (check out this video) after he shut his run down with 25 meters to go. He jogged the last 25 meters people! And he still won the race with total ease. There is something to be said for guys who quietly celebrate inside while maintaining a calm exterior, but come on! This kid just won a gold medal and is the fastest person known in the history of mankind. Give him a break.

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It’s not a sport!

Why isn’t there Olympic singing, Olympic painting, Olympic stand up comedy, or Olympic ballroom dancing? We might as well add these and many other events to the Olympics to complement synchronized swimming, diving, artistic gymnastics, figure skating, ski jumping, ice dancing, and all the other exhibitions in which winners are determined on the basis of artistic impression and a judge’s opinion. In past Olympics, it has been proven that judges have been taking money to ensure certain competitors receive favorable scores. Last night, a Chinese gymnast beat the American on the vault for a Bronze even though the Chinese contestant fell and the American girl did not. In what should have been a major deduction for the fall, along with another deduction for improperly executing the vault, points mysteriously were NOT taken off.

Don’t get me wrong. I appreciate watching the gymnastic events. My beef is that these exhibitions are placed on the same level with track and field events like the marathon which test the heart of an athlete, the 100 meter sprint which measures raw speed, shot put showing pure power, and on the level with the swimming races in which there is a measurable specific objective, and so the list goes on.

If it’s about what people enjoy watching, then we need to have a format like “Dancing With The Stars” and allow us to see tuxedoed men and gowned women demonstrating their talents while competing for gold. What is the difference?

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The Beijing fakery scandal deepens.

I am not surprised. We have more admissions by Beijing that the opening ceremony was fake. The 9 year old girl who appeared to have sung the national anthem for the opening ceremony actually lip sync’ed the song which was recorded previously by a 7 year old. The 7 year old was rejected for the leading role in the ceremony having been deemed unsuited for the stage because her teeth were not nice enough.

This is what happens when an authoritarian regime tries to project an image of national perfection. Symbolism over substance, as Rush would quite often say, is very important to a nation and government struggling for recognition and respect.

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The Olympics in Red China

What to do? In 1980, President Carter told the world that the USA along with 50-60 other nations would not participate in the Games of the XXII Olympiad which were being held in a communist dictatorship in Moscow, USSR. The USSR had a history of harsh prison sentences, a lack of property rights or individual and civil liberties, and the occasional torture and execution to boot. They were also involved in an illegal war in Afghanistan. Though it was and still is a controversial decision, I believe Carter did the right thing. We would not lend credence to a government that oppressed so many people in the name of political ideology (a veiled power grab, truth be known).

Here we are, 28 years later and the Olympics are once again being held in a totalitarian communist nation. With news reports that dissidents are being jailed to prevent them from being seen protesting and making trouble on the world stage while so many nations will have cameras on them, and other news stories stating that China is restricting internet access from their people and outside news agencies, I ask: Should we be there?

From the above linked Washington Post article on dissidents being jailed:

The crackdown comes seven years after the secretary general of the Beijing Olympic Bid Committee declared that staging the Games in the Chinese capital would “not only promote our economy but also enhance all social conditions, including education, health and human rights.”

Now, human rights have been set back rather than enhanced, activists say.

“The Olympics have reversed the clock,” said Nicholas Bequelin, a Hong Kong-based specialist for Human Rights in China.

Another foreign human rights advocacy group, Amnesty International, came to a similar conclusion in a report issued Monday titled “The Olympics Countdown — Broken Promises.

I really love the Olympic games. It’s great to see the spirit of competition and cooperation. You may ask, “How can we punish the athletes who are not political? How can we punish the other nations of the world and millions of proud patriotic fans by withdrawing our support?” It’s a tough pill to swallow. Someone has to pay for this atrocity that is having the olympics in an oppressive communist nation.

“Show them the spirit of freedom, open their eyes to the greatness of our free system and they will embrace and emulate us!” you say? Isn’t that like seeing someone mugged and instead of coming to the aid and defense of the innocent, we look at the attacker, walk over and hug someone and say “this is how you should treat other people”. I say we should do more than model good behavior; we should combine the modeling of good behavior with the fight against bad behavior.

I will watch and pull for the US in the Olympics this Summer. I hope we clean up in medals and especially beat the snot out of the host country. But if I had my choice, I would have preferred that the USA boycott these Olympic games and let the IOC be on notice that the world’s greatest nation will not participate in validating China’s oppressive regime.

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Thoughts Benedict

And now for some personal venting… brace yourself.

  1. “Sick” is going around bigtime in the Johnson kingdom.  I was diagnosed two days ago with sinusitis and was given antibiotics.  I have had it since Friday when I went to my job’s site medical to get some cold medicine.  I had fever, chills, headache, body ache, and sore throat.  I stuck it out at work though, but it turned out to NOT be a cold.  I also had pink eye (which is now cured thanks to my sulfur eye drops.
  2. Marcela was diagnosed with the same sinusitis a couple weeks ago, and then she got sick in her digestive system the day before yesterday.  She has been coughing hardcore for the past two weeks.  The cough that we now both have is driving us both NUTS.  I feel like I am going insane.  😦  My little Marcela said the same thing.  Prescription cough medicine is doing very little to help.
  3. Whatever stomach problem she had, I now have.  I went to work this morning at 5 AM, and left fatigued due to coughing all night and doing other things all night.  I RARELY miss work.  I can endure a cold, but stomach problems really get me.
  4. I went to bed at 9:30 PM and when I got out of bed at 4 AM, my dinner from the night before was still in my throat.  I have been asleep all day trying to let it go. Thank you Lord, I am feeling quite a bit better right now.
  5. Kelly and Kourtney were sick all day Tuesday, and now McKenna is sick with the same stomach problems. My dad called out of work today with stomach problems, and I just found that out when my mom (who is also sick with the stomach problems) came by my house to bring me Emetrol.  WHAT’S GOING ON?!?!

Now that I have that off my chest I can get on to my thoughts…

  • 2 major disasters have struck Asia in the last week.
  1. Between 100,000 and 250,000 are dead in Burma due to a cyclone and flooding, with more death on its way due to the communist/military regime that will not allow outsiders in to help.
  2. China’s Sichuan Province was hit with a magnitude 7.9 earthquake and more than 15,000 are already dead.  Government officials (who are only a little more open than the Burmese Junta) estimate that about 20,000 more are buried under the ruins of their homes, schools, and businesses.  I have seen some of the video of the actual earthquake and it is unbelievable.  The pictures and videos of the rescue and recovery are heartbreaking.  Lord help them.
  • Breakfast with Trav and Chris on Tuesday was great.  We talked about blogging and expand our internet empires.  Chris is trying to say that he is subsidizing my web traffic with his blog.  LOL I still can’t get him to enter the Twitter world yet, but I am working on it.  But I did get some hints on how to increase traffic.  I found out that Saturday is usually the slowest traffic day for Trav and Chris.  I guess due to my top 5 it is a little bit of a boost for my Saturdays.
  • I just bought a Wii entertainment system, and it was delivered today.  Unfortunately, I am too sick to even open it up.  But if anyone is interested in getting a beat down in boxing, or whipped in tennis, or something like that, let me know and we will arrange for it to happen.  This weekend I will open the box and set it up.
  • I’m going to get my stuff together and go to the production and music meeting today at the church office. If you are there, forgive me in advance for looking like garbage.

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