Tag Archives: Olympics

Beijing olympic fakery.

I found an article outlining accusations, responses, and analysis of the fakery produced by Beijing and NBC’s coverage. This, to me, underscores the fact that the “mainstream” media outlets cannot be trusted. They actually added pre-recorded and CGI fireworks to the olympic opening ceremony. They also admittedly leave the “Live” stamp on the screen for the west coast viewers who are watching delays of two to three hours. Their claim is that knowledgeable viewers understand that there is a delay. It’s obvious that they are trying to add a sense of urgency and excitement that one is watching something live in order to boost the ratings. The offense with the openning ceremony and the fake fireworks is even worse. It’s bad enough that we are in a communist nation for the olympic games, but to add to the production and spectacle complicit with Beijing is even more sickening. How can anything they do or report be trusted? NBC should be ashamed.

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Did you see the Men’s 4×100?

I tuned in to watch some Olympic competition last night.  Michael Phelps was going for his second gold medal out of his attempted record-breaking 8 golds.  His attempt to surpass Mark Spitz record of 7 gold medals which have stood since 1972 started out well when he won the 400 meter individual medley.  Of all his 8 attempts, the 400 IM and the 4×100 relays were considered the most unlikely.

The French were highly favored to win this 4×100, and they were very arrogant.  Alain Bernard, a member of the French relay team even stated that they were going to “smash” the Americans.  Well, what happened was beautiful!  Phelps opened the relay with the first leg.  He didn’t give us the lead, but he did well.  Garrett Weber-Gale over the next 100 M put us in a good position to win, then Cullen Jones let things start slipping away in the third leg.  When Jason Lezak took the fourth leg, I felt our chances slipping.  Alain Bernard was the French anchor who has so arrogantly stated that the French would “smash” us.  He was also one of the “no weak links” French relay members who were turning in lightning fast splits for the past several months.  As they reached the turn at 50 meters, the lead was more than half a body length.  Lezak was just too far back.  I told my wife the race was over.  The commentator said that the US was trying to hold on for a silver with the Aussies pursuing.  Then with about 35 meters left, something happened.  The commentator said something to the effect of “Lezak is making a run” and I told Marcela he was just hyping it up.  Lezak really did start tightening up on the leader.  With 20 meters left, he was within one arm’s length.  “There isn’t enough left, it’s over,” I told Marcela.  5 meters left and he is moving up fast!  He draws even at the last two strokes and stretches….

UNBELIEVABLE!  How did that happen?  The French look like someone just beat them up and stole their croissants.  I don’t believe what I just saw.  Phelps is flexing and going crazy, Weber-Gale is trying to upstage Phelps flexing in front of him, everyone is hugging, and Lezak just turned in the fastest split in Olympic 4×100 history!  For me, that was the most exciting swimming event I have ever seen.  It is up there as the greatest Olympic moment I have watched.

Phelps is now 2 for 2, with only 6 more gold medals to go.

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The Olympics in Red China

What to do? In 1980, President Carter told the world that the USA along with 50-60 other nations would not participate in the Games of the XXII Olympiad which were being held in a communist dictatorship in Moscow, USSR. The USSR had a history of harsh prison sentences, a lack of property rights or individual and civil liberties, and the occasional torture and execution to boot. They were also involved in an illegal war in Afghanistan. Though it was and still is a controversial decision, I believe Carter did the right thing. We would not lend credence to a government that oppressed so many people in the name of political ideology (a veiled power grab, truth be known).

Here we are, 28 years later and the Olympics are once again being held in a totalitarian communist nation. With news reports that dissidents are being jailed to prevent them from being seen protesting and making trouble on the world stage while so many nations will have cameras on them, and other news stories stating that China is restricting internet access from their people and outside news agencies, I ask: Should we be there?

From the above linked Washington Post article on dissidents being jailed:

The crackdown comes seven years after the secretary general of the Beijing Olympic Bid Committee declared that staging the Games in the Chinese capital would “not only promote our economy but also enhance all social conditions, including education, health and human rights.”

Now, human rights have been set back rather than enhanced, activists say.

“The Olympics have reversed the clock,” said Nicholas Bequelin, a Hong Kong-based specialist for Human Rights in China.

Another foreign human rights advocacy group, Amnesty International, came to a similar conclusion in a report issued Monday titled “The Olympics Countdown — Broken Promises.

I really love the Olympic games. It’s great to see the spirit of competition and cooperation. You may ask, “How can we punish the athletes who are not political? How can we punish the other nations of the world and millions of proud patriotic fans by withdrawing our support?” It’s a tough pill to swallow. Someone has to pay for this atrocity that is having the olympics in an oppressive communist nation.

“Show them the spirit of freedom, open their eyes to the greatness of our free system and they will embrace and emulate us!” you say? Isn’t that like seeing someone mugged and instead of coming to the aid and defense of the innocent, we look at the attacker, walk over and hug someone and say “this is how you should treat other people”. I say we should do more than model good behavior; we should combine the modeling of good behavior with the fight against bad behavior.

I will watch and pull for the US in the Olympics this Summer. I hope we clean up in medals and especially beat the snot out of the host country. But if I had my choice, I would have preferred that the USA boycott these Olympic games and let the IOC be on notice that the world’s greatest nation will not participate in validating China’s oppressive regime.

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